Exploring the biochemistry of the prenylome and its role in disease through proteomics: progress and potential

Expert Review of Proteomics

22 May May 2017 one month ago
  • Brioschi M, Martinez Fernandez A, Banfi C.

Protein prenylation is a ubiquitous covalent post-translational modification characterized by the addition of farnesyl or geranylgeranyl isoprenoid groups to a cysteine residue located near the carboxyl terminal of a protein. It is essential for the proper localization and cellular activity of numerous proteins, including Ras family GTPases and G-proteins. In addition to its roles in cellular physiology, the prenylation process has important implications in human diseases and in the recent years, it has become attractive target of inhibitors with therapeutic potential.

Areas covered This review attempts to summarize the basic aspects of prenylation integrating them with biological functions in diseases and giving an account of the current status of prenylation inhibitors as potential therapeutics. The Authors also summarize the methodologies for the characterization of this modification.

Expert commentary The growing body of evidence suggesting an important role of prenylation in diseases and the subsequent development of inhibitors of the enzymes responsible for this modification lead to the urgent need to identify the full spectrum of prenylated proteins that are altered in the disease or affected by drugs. Proteomic tools to analyze prenylated proteins are recently emerging, thanks to the advancement in the field of mass spectrometry coupled to enrichment strategies.

Reference

  • Brioschi M, Martinez Fernandez A, Banfi C. Exploring the biochemistry of the prenylome and its role in disease through proteomics: progress and potential. Expert Rev Proteomics 2017 May 18. doi: 10.1080/14789450.2017.1332998. [Epub ahead of print] Go to PubMed